AN OVERVIEW OF CHRISTIAN DEISM

(Note: In this essay, I am providing an overview of Christian Deism as a natural religion. It brings together a number of themes found in some of my other essays. Brother John)

How you live your life and the happiness you find are largely dependent upon your view of yourself and the world that you live in. Your view of life is known as your "worldview," or "religion," or "philosophy of life."

Your understanding of life comes from what you are taught by others, and by what you learn from your own sense perception, experience, and reasoning. Sense perception refers to what you learn through your five senses: sight, hearing, touch, taste, and smell. Experience refers to what you learn from what happens to you as you interact with the world around you. Reasoning refers to what you learn from thinking about what you perceive and experience.

The word "religion" comes from the Latin word "religio" which is related to the verb "religare" meaning "to bind" or "place an obligation on." The World Book Dictionary defines "obligation" as "duty" meaning "a thing that a person ought to do, or a thing that is right to do." In other words, "religion" deals with "how a person ought to live" or "what is right to do."

When we look around us, we see many different "organized religions" such as Judaism, Christianity, Islam, Hinduism, Buddhism, and others. These "religions" offer different views of life, and offer instructions about "how a person ought to live." Some religions claim that their teachings came from "supernatural revelations" received by particular individuals such as Moses, Muhammad, or Paul of Tarsus.

These so-called "revealed" religions make exclusive claims to knowing the "truth" from God, and the followers of other religions are frequently viewed as "infidels" or "unbelievers." This has led to hostility, oppression, persecution and wars between the followers of different religions.

In contrast to so-called "revealed" religions, there is another kind of religion called "natural" religion. Whereas "revealed" religion claims that truth about life comes through some supernatural revelation from a source beyond human knowledge and experience, "natural" religion is based on what human beings can discover from their own sense perceptions, experiences, and reasoning.

One of the greatest teachers of natural religion was a man named Jesus from Nazareth. Jesus was a Jew, reared in an ancient form of Judaism, but his personal perceptions, experiences, and thinking led him to a deeper understanding of life, and how it is intended to be lived. Jesus described himself simply as "a man who told you the truth which I heard from God" (John 8:40) but Jesus did not claim to have any special revelation of truth from God.

Jesus said that everyone knows the truth, "It is written in the prophets, 'And they shall all be taught by God.' Everyone who has heard and learned from the Father comes to me" (John 6:45). Jesus also said, "My teaching is not mine, but His who sent me; if any man's will is to do His (God's) will, he will know whether the teaching is from God or whether I am speaking on my own authority" (John 7:16-17). According to these statements, people already know God's will and those who are seeking to follow it can recognize that Jesus is teaching the truth, and they will be attracted to Jesus.

Jesus summarized God's truth or "commandments" (laws) as "You shall love the Lord your God with all your heart, and with all your soul, and with all your mind. This is the greatest commandment. And the second is like it: You shall love your neighbor as yourself" (Matthew 22:37-39). The word "love" means "to appreciate" or "to value." We should appreciate God as the giver of life, and we should value life in other persons as much as we value life in ourselves.

We show our appreciation to God by how we use the life we have been given. We show our appreciation for the value of life in others by how we treat them. Human nature is designed for living by love. Everyone knows that our Creator intends for us to live by love because failure to love is destructive to life, our own and others. We know this from our own perceptions, experiences, and thinking. This truth is the foundation of natural religion.

Failure to love is acting against our human nature. We fail to love God when we waste the gift of life that God has given to us. We fail to love other persons when we cause human suffering or when we do not try to relieve human suffering when we have the ability and opportunity to do so.

In his parable of the "talents" (Matthew 25:14-30), Jesus taught that we show our love to God by how we use the life that God has entrusted to us. In his parable of the "good Samaritan" (Luke 10:30-37), Jesus taught that we fail to love others when we cause human suffering or when we do not try to relieve human suffering when we can do so.

In his parable of the "good Samaritan," Jesus expanded the definition of "neighbor" to include everyone, even those who are viewed as "enemies." Jesus said, "You have heard it said, 'You shall love your neighbor but hate your enemy,' but I say to you, Love your enemy and pray for those who persecute you, so you may be sons of your Father who is in heaven; for He makes his sun rise on the evil and on the good, and sends rain on the just and the unjust" (Matthew 5:43-45).

Jesus added, "Love your enemies, do good to those who hate you" (Luke 6:27). Love your enemies and do good . . . . for He (God) is kind to the ungrateful and selfish. Be merciful, even as your Father (God) is merciful" (Luke 6:35-36). Jesus went far beyond the religion that he had been taught in his day. Just as God provides the necessities of sunshine and rain to all persons, including the "good and evil" and the "just and unjust," we must be ready to "do good" and "be merciful" to all persons, even those we consider our "enemies."

The failure to love God or "neighbor" (all persons) is called "sin." The only remedy for sin is repentance. Jesus taught the meaning of "repentance" in his parable of the "prodigal son" (Luke 15:11-24). According to Jesus, repentance is the prerequisite for receiving forgiveness of sins, "If your brother sins, rebuke him, and if he repents, forgive him; and if he sins against you seven times in a day and turns to you seven times, and says, 'I repent," you must forgive him" (Luke 17:3-4). Also, Jesus said, "If you forgive men their trespasses (against you), your heavenly Father will also forgive you; but if you do not forgive men their trespasses (against you), neither will your Father forgive your trespasses" (Matthew 6:14-15).

In the teachings of Jesus, we see the essence of natural religion.

Unfortunately, soon after Jesus' lifetime, a man named Paul of Tarsus began proclaiming a very different message. Paul never claimed to have seen or heard Jesus during Jesus' lifetime, but claimed that Jesus had appeared later to Paul in some kind of vision after the death of Jesus. Paul began preaching that Jesus "was in the form of God, . . . . but emptied himself, taking the form of a servant, being born in the likeness of men. And being found in human form, he humbled himself and became obedient unto death, even death of the cross" (Philippians 2:6-7).

Paul viewed the crucifixion of Jesus as a sacrifice to God to atone for the sins of humankind. Paul wrote, "But God shows his love for us in that while we were yet sinners Christ (Jesus) died for us. Since therefore we are now justified by his blood, much more shall we be saved from the wrath of God" (Romans 5:8-9). According to Jesus, we are forgiven by God if we repent of our sins and we are willing to forgive others who sin against us, but Paul taught that Jesus had to die as a human sacrifice to obtain God's forgiveness and save us "from the wrath of God." Paul's teaching, or "gospel," was very different from Jesus' gospel.

Paul claimed that his "gospel" was revealed directly to Paul by Jesus after the death of Jesus. Paul wrote, "For I would have you know, brethren, that the gospel which was preached by me is not man's gospel. For I did not receive it from man, nor was I taught it, but it came through a revelation of Jesus Christ" (Galatians 1:11-12).

It is clear that Paul replaced Jesus' natural religion with a so-called "revealed" religion. In all of his letters found in the New Testament, Paul never quotes the teachings of Jesus. Jesus' gospel calling for people to repent of their failures to love, and to forgive each other, was replaced with Paul's "gospel" of blood sacrifice to appease an angry God. A series of church councils in the fourth century compounded the errors of Paul by making Jesus equal to God and institutionalizing Paul's "substitutionary theory" of atonement.

In the seventeenth century, in England, a movement called "deism" began in opposition to the doctrines that had been adopted by the church after the time of Jesus. The deists opposed the doctrines of original sin, the virgin birth and divinity of Jesus, the "trinity" of God, blood atonement by the death of Jesus, and "hell" as a place of unending torture. The deists viewed so-called "miracles" as unverifiable, and they viewed so-called "supernatural revelation of truth" as unnecessary.

The deists believed in natural religion rather than revealed religion. Most of the deists viewed themselves as "Christians" who were seeking to return to the natural religion taught by a man named Jesus. The words "deism" and "deist" come from the Latin word "Deus" which means "God." Deists believe in one God and they view Jesus as simply a human being. Christian Deists view Jesus as a great teacher of deism.

Brother John

April 29, 2004

Back to main page